Keeping your Lhasa Apso Healthy

Glaucoma in the Lhasa Apso
By Jenny Drastura

Lhasa Apsos are susceptible to a number of eye conditions, including dry eye, cataracts and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). There is one condition, however, that is often overlooked until it is too late. That is glaucoma, the most devastating eye disease a Lhasa, or any dog, can develop.

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Heart Murmurs in Older, Small Breed Dogs
By Jenny Drastura

Our 10-year-old Lhasa was a few months late for her annual exam, but she was the one we never worried about. Never sick a day in her life, she bounced all over the house and made it up the stairs in a flash. When the veterinarian said she had a Grade 3 heart murmur, we were shocked. She showed no signs of anything being wrong. A year later – still no signs, and the murmur remained Grade 3.

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Reverse Sneezing in the Lhasa Apso
By Jenny Drastura

It can be frightening to see your Lhasa suddenly begin wheezing and snorting, seemingly unable to breathe. Fortunately, it may not be quite as serious as it looks.

This “snorting” is called reverse sneezing, or inspiratory paroxysmal respiration. With this condition, the dog rapidly pulls air into the nose, whereas in a normal sneeze, the air is rapidly pushed out through the nose.

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Pigmentary Keratitis
Can Your Lhasa Apso See?
By Jenny Drastura

How many times have people approached you and your Lhasa and asked, "Can your dog see through all that hair?" Well, in addition to hair obstructing your dog’s view, it could also be causing harm to his or her eyes.

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Hemorrhagic Gastroenteritis (HGE)
By Jenny Drastura

HGE is a life-threatening disease that can occur in small and medium-sized breeds, but has an excellent cure rate. Seeing our dogs with bloody diarrhea can give us a real scare. It can be a sign of a minor gastrointestinal upset or the dog swallowing bits of a hard toy. It can also signal a more serious illness.

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